ARTICLES ABOUT AGE SPOTS & MELASMA

 

 


Watch the video : Melasma : A Deep Dive into the Cause & Treatment

(The following is a transcription of the above video)

Today we’re going to be discussing melasma.

Now before we get into exactly how we treat melasma, it’s very important that we discuss first, what creates melasma. And to do that we have to take a deep dive into the physiology of the skin, precisely of the skin of the face.

Where Melasma Forms in Your Skin

So let’s take a look at a diagram of the skin.

 

Melasma is a very difficult and tricky skin condition to resolve. It appears as dark patches of pigmentation on the skin that often sneaks up onto a woman’s face. One day out-of-the-blue, she suddenly notices a dark shadow or “patch” appearing on her face. The hyperpigmentation can vary from wide and diffuse to a bunch of smaller dark spots (like freckles) that never bothered her before, that suddenly grow bigger and darker and merge into a single larger dark patch on her face.

 

Melasma is one of the most prominent skin problems in the world. Nearly 6 million Americans suffer from Melasma. The problem reveals itself in the form of dark spots on skin including the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper lip and chin. However, the dark spots of Melasma can be found in other areas that are exposed to the sun. Other common areas include the neck and forearms.

Melasma can affect a wide variety of people but women are the most likely candidates.

 

By far, when working with hyperpigmentation issues,  dark skin is the most difficult, reactive and challenging skin. Such as those with Mayan, Native American and Asian origins, and especially East Asian skin types, such as Indian/Pakistani.

Even when such ethic skin is otherwise healthy, treating a melasma is extra challenging and requires additional testing and ongoing modifications to avoid the natural tendency of darker “ethnic” skin to hyper-pigment in reaction to any kind of irritation.